How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

Microsoft Office and Google Docs are both powerful tools for getting things done. While Microsoft Office is well-known and widely used, Google Docs is not far behind in terms of functionality. In fact, Google Docs offers a free backup app for Android and iOS devices, making it a cost-effective choice for users.

How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

MS Office has unique features not found in Google Docs, but there are workarounds. Users may not know that Google Sheets can easily create striped tables, similar to MS Office’s ‘Quick Styles’ menu. How can this be achieved? It’s quite simple.

The Magic Formula for Rows

The Google Docs suite doesn’t support zebra stripes, but you can use conditional formatting as a workaround. Finding it in its current avatar may be a bit harder. To access the conditional formatting options, click on “Format” in the top menu.

How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

Select the range you need to work on, such as A1 to Z100. Then, click on “Custom formula is” and enter the formula “=ISEVEN(ROW())” in the box.

How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

When you enter the formula here, the sheet turns into a zebra. Alternate rows will be filled with the chosen color and changing the color is as easy as clicking on the icon.

After this is done, click on “Add another rule” and instead of the previous formula, insert this formula:

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=ISODD(ROW())

How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

The idea is simple. To change the color, click on the icon and choose the desired look.

Same Formula Works for Columns

The same methodology also works for columns. Instead of using the ROW function in our formula, replace it with COLUMN. Specifically, =ISEVEN(COLUMN())

How to Color Alternate Rows or Columns in Google Sheets

All previous steps are the same, including adding the formula for odd-numbered columns.

Google Drive: We have covered various topics, such as transferring ownership in Drive, opening Google Drive files from its website in desktop apps, and comparing it to Dropbox and SpiderOak.

Easy as You Like it

I hope that was useful for those of you who use Google Drive and Sheets regularly. We at twothirds.us certainly do, and hacks like these are life-savers. Join us in our forum if you have any questions or better hacks to share.

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